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A CARVED LYRE MIRROR ATTRIBUTED TO HOLLAND HOUSE

A CARVED LYRE MIRROR ATTRIBUTED TO HOLLAND HOUSE

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English, second half 18th century

With imposing scale and beautifully carved crest and featuring exuberant Acanthus scrolls. Aged, naturally lightened and desaturated mellow oak patina - compliments contemporary pieces. Statement bespoke design. Provenance points to this mirror being situated and perhaps commissioned at Holland House a significant Jacobean house in London, a photograph of the mirror above a carved mantlepiece accompanies this sale.

Dimensions: H 154cm x W 130cm x D 8cm

Holland House: originally known as Cope Castle, was an early Jacobean country house in Kensington, London, situated in a country estate that is now Holland Park. It was built in 1605 by the diplomat Sir Walter Cope. The building later passed by marriage to Henry Rich, 1st Baron Kensington, 1st Earl of Holland, and by descent through the Rich family, then became the property of the Fox family, during which time it became a noted gathering-place for Whigs in the 19th century. The house was largely destroyed by German firebombing during the Blitz in 1940 and today only the east wing and some ruins of the ground floor and south facade remain, along with various outbuildings and formal gardens.

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